The Scientist

» research misconduct and immunology

Most Recent

image: Why So Soon?

Why So Soon?

By | May 1, 2013

Researchers are using modern experimental tools to probe the mysterious molecular pathways that lead to premature labor and birth.


image: Decade-Long Misconduct Case Closed

Decade-Long Misconduct Case Closed

By | April 9, 2013

A former University of Washington researcher did commit misconduct 10 years ago, according to the Office of Research Integrity.


image: Mimicking Mussels

Mimicking Mussels

By | April 1, 2013

Scientists develop a gel that mimics mollusc glue to coat the insides of blood vessels.

1 Comment

image: Disputed Research Ends in Tragedy

Disputed Research Ends in Tragedy

By | March 14, 2013

A biomedical researcher whose Nature paper was called into question was found dead in his lab.  


image: Plagiarism in Successful NSF Proposals

Plagiarism in Successful NSF Proposals

By | March 10, 2013

Using plagiarism detection software, the NSF’s internal watchdog has found almost 100 suspicious cases among the 8,000 projects the agency funded in 2011.


image: Antibody-Dependent Enhanced (ADE) Immunity

Antibody-Dependent Enhanced (ADE) Immunity

By | March 2, 2013

The method to the dengue virus's maddening infectiousness.


image: Bedeviled by Dengue

Bedeviled by Dengue

By | March 1, 2013

The global spread of dengue virus has immunologists and public-health experts debating the best way to curb infection.


image: Gel Drama

Gel Drama

By | February 26, 2013

A mysterious case of proteomics plagiarism leads to an odd timeline for a retraction.


image: Do Mice Make Bad Models?

Do Mice Make Bad Models?

By | February 11, 2013

A study suggests that some mouse models do not accurately mimic human molecular mechanisms of inflammatory response, but other mouse strains may fare better.


image: Physiologist Faked Data

Physiologist Faked Data

By | February 5, 2013

A Case Western Reserve University researcher is found guilty of altering the number of samples and results to inflate the statistical significance of his findings.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Inside a Lab Mouse’s High-Fat Diet
  2. Antidepressant Exerts Epigenetic Changes
  3. How Gastric Bypass Can Kill Sugar Cravings
  4. Birth of the Skin Microbiome
    Daily News Birth of the Skin Microbiome

    The immune system tolerates the colonization of commensal bacteria on the skin with the aid of regulatory T cells during the first few weeks of life, a mouse study shows.

Life Technologies