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image: Misconduct Around the Globe

Misconduct Around the Globe

By | June 1, 2013

Research misconduct is not limited to the developed world, but few countries anywhere are responding adequately.

3 Comments

Malaria parasites transmitted via mosquitoes elicit a more effective immune response and cause less severe infection than those directly injected into red blood cells.

0 Comments

image: Macrophages Drive Regeneration

Macrophages Drive Regeneration

By | May 22, 2013

The activity of one type of immune cell helps regrow the limbs of amputated salamanders.

3 Comments

image: New Guardians Against Diabetes?

New Guardians Against Diabetes?

By | May 20, 2013

A new class of immune cell could protect against type 1 diabetes by suppressing other immune cells.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review, May 13–17

Week in Review, May 13–17

By | May 17, 2013

Reading pathogen epigenomes; a new stem cell; dealing with research misconduct; monkey fossils; exploratory mice grow new neurons; watching metamorphosis

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Ethics Training in Science

Opinion: Ethics Training in Science

By | May 14, 2013

The NIH has required researchers to receive instruction about responsible conduct for more than 20 years, but misconduct is still on the rise.

9 Comments

image: Opinion: Remediating Misconduct

Opinion: Remediating Misconduct

By | May 14, 2013

Should institutions invest in changing the behavior of scientists found guilty of violating research rules and ethics?

3 Comments

image: Dutch Researcher Retracts More Papers

Dutch Researcher Retracts More Papers

By | May 6, 2013

Fifty-three studies authored by shamed Tilburg University social psychologist Diederik Stapel have now been pulled from the literature.

0 Comments

image: Gregory Sonnenberg: Cellular Spy

Gregory Sonnenberg: Cellular Spy

By | May 1, 2013

Research Associate, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania. Age: 27

1 Comment

image: Suited to a T

Suited to a T

By | May 1, 2013

Sorting out T-cell functional and phenotypic heterogeneity depends on studying single cells.

1 Comment

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