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image: Opinion: Going International

Opinion: Going International

By and | June 10, 2013

US universities need to reach across their own borders to retain global scientific preeminence.

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image: Opinion: The Dilemma of Diversity

Opinion: The Dilemma of Diversity

By | June 10, 2013

The NIH remains a Caucasian-dominated workforce. Why haven’t the agency’s efforts to diversify been successful?

3 Comments

image: BPTW: By The Numbers

BPTW: By The Numbers

By | June 1, 2013

Take a closer look at some of the statistics generated by The Scientist's Best Place to Work Industry 2013 survey.

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image: Defending Against Plagiarism

Defending Against Plagiarism

By | June 1, 2013

Publishers need to be proactive about detecting and deterring copied text.

5 Comments

image: Making Good on Research

Making Good on Research

By | June 1, 2013

Scientists working in developing nations who engage in capacity building find it bolsters the lives of locals and their own work.

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image: Misconduct Around the Globe

Misconduct Around the Globe

By | June 1, 2013

Research misconduct is not limited to the developed world, but few countries anywhere are responding adequately.

3 Comments

image: Best Places to Work Industry 2013

Best Places to Work Industry 2013

By | June 1, 2013

Our final survey of the life-science industry workplace highlights the companies—small and large, domestic and international—that are making their researchers feel valued and at home.

2 Comments

image: It Takes a Village

It Takes a Village

By | June 1, 2013

Scientists working in developing countries find that giving back to local communities enriches their own research.

3 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | May 23, 2013

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

1 Comment

image: Week in Review, May 13–17

Week in Review, May 13–17

By | May 17, 2013

Reading pathogen epigenomes; a new stem cell; dealing with research misconduct; monkey fossils; exploratory mice grow new neurons; watching metamorphosis

0 Comments

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