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image: Buzzed Honeybees

Buzzed Honeybees

By | October 20, 2015

Caffeinated nectar makes bees more loyal to a food source, even when foraging there is suboptimal.


image: One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

By | October 6, 2015

A global assessment of declining cacti populations places responsibility on increasing human activities.


image: Organ Engineer Cleared of Misconduct

Organ Engineer Cleared of Misconduct

By | August 31, 2015

The Karolinska Institute has rejected the conclusions of an earlier, independent investigation, finding regenerative medicine researcher Paolo Macchiarini not guilty of scientific misconduct.

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image: Butterflies in Peril

Butterflies in Peril

By | August 12, 2015

Several recent studies point to serious—and mysterious—declines in butterfly numbers across the globe.


image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.


image: Report: Plant Biologist Guilty of Misconduct

Report: Plant Biologist Guilty of Misconduct

By | July 10, 2015

Investigators find that RNAi researcher Olivier Voinnet willfully misrepresented data published in several journals.

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image: 1 + 1 = 1

1 + 1 = 1

By | July 1, 2015

Nutrient levels in soil don’t add up when food chains combine.


image: Intelligence Gathering

Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century


image: Keeping Science Pubs Clean

Keeping Science Pubs Clean

By | June 29, 2015

Science releases new guidelines for research transparency, hoping to stem the tide of retractions and misconduct.


image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.


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