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image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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image: GM Rice Researchers Sacked

GM Rice Researchers Sacked

By | December 13, 2012

An official investigation into a controversial GM rice study carried out with Chinese schoolchildren has resulted in the removal of three China-based researchers.

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image: Old Ocean Mold

Old Ocean Mold

By | December 12, 2012

Fungi in 100 million year-old seafloor sediments could possess novel antibiotics.

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image: Marlboro Chicks

Marlboro Chicks

By | December 5, 2012

Two species of songbirds pack their nests with scavenged cigarette butts that repel irksome parasites.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | December 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Coughing Seashells

Coughing Seashells

By | November 28, 2012

A type of scallop expels water and waste through a sort of cough that could reveal clues about water quality.

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image: Beetles Warm BC Forests

Beetles Warm BC Forests

By | November 27, 2012

Using satellite data, researchers calculate that mountain pine beetle infestations raise summertime temperatures in British Columbia’s pine forests by 1 degree Celsius.

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image: Embattled Ape Researcher Reinstated

Embattled Ape Researcher Reinstated

By | November 26, 2012

A controversial primate researcher is back at work after being cleared of endangering bonobos under her care, but critics are demanding an external enquiry.

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image: Old New Species

Old New Species

By | November 20, 2012

Decades can pass between the discovery of a new animal or plant and its official debut in the scientific literature.

4 Comments

image: No Sex Required

No Sex Required

By | November 19, 2012

An all-female species, distantly related to flatworms, steals all of genetic material it needs to diversify its genome.

2 Comments

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