The Scientist

» research misconduct and evolution

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image: Source of Scales, Feathers, Hair

Source of Scales, Feathers, Hair

By | June 27, 2016

Reptiles, birds, and mammals all produce tiny, bump-like structures during development.   

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image: More Retractions for Cancer Researcher

More Retractions for Cancer Researcher

By | June 22, 2016

An institutional investigation has found evidence of image manipulation in two studies coauthored by Bharat Aggarwal.

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image: Evolution of Fish Bioluminescence

Evolution of Fish Bioluminescence

By | June 9, 2016

Fish evolved to make their own light at least 27 times, according to a study.

1 Comment

A transposon underlies this classic story of evolutionary adaptation.

1 Comment

image: Start Making Sense

Start Making Sense

By | June 1, 2016

Scientific progress is only achieved when humans' innate sense of understanding is validated by objective reality.

6 Comments

image: ORI: Researcher Faked Dozens of Experiments

ORI: Researcher Faked Dozens of Experiments

By | May 25, 2016

A former scientist at the University of Michigan and the University of Chicago made up more than 70 experiments on heart cells, according to the Office of Research Integrity.

2 Comments

Caltech’s Frances Arnold is honored for her work on directed evolution.

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image: Another Retraction for Diabetes Researcher

Another Retraction for Diabetes Researcher

By | May 23, 2016

PLOS Biology pulls a 2011 study led by Mário Saad, while his institution investigates additional allegations of research misconduct related to papers published in other journals. 

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | May 17, 2016

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes  

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image: Mysterious Eukaryote Missing Mitochondria

Mysterious Eukaryote Missing Mitochondria

By | May 12, 2016

Researchers uncover the first example of a eukaryotic organism that lacks the organelles.

5 Comments

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