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image: Top 10 Retractions of 2013

Top 10 Retractions of 2013

By | December 30, 2013

A look at this year’s most memorable retractions

5 Comments

image: Week in Review, July 8–12

Week in Review, July 8–12

By | July 12, 2013

Editor accused of fraud leaves post; the good and the bad of gut microbiota; bacterial gene shuffle; legal restrictions hamper illicit drug research; antibodies and autism

0 Comments

image: Editor Quits After Fraud Allegations

Editor Quits After Fraud Allegations

By | July 10, 2013

Dmitry Kuznetsov, former chief editor of two science journals, denies any wrongdoing, but agrees to leave his posts after The Scientist reported on numerous accusations of misconduct.

4 Comments

image: Week in Review, July 1–5

Week in Review, July 1–5

By | July 5, 2013

Fraudulent journal editor?; fat cells detect temp, generate heat; the importance of social media in science communication; functional livers from iPSCs; antibiotics damage mitochondria

0 Comments

image: Accused “Fraudster” Heads Two Journals

Accused “Fraudster” Heads Two Journals

By | July 2, 2013

A Russian researcher suspected of multiple counts of fakery is chief editor of two scientific publications.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Unethical Ethics Monitoring

Opinion: Unethical Ethics Monitoring

By | June 25, 2013

Anti-plagiarism service iThenticate breached ethical boundaries in its design and interpretation of a survey of the top ethical concerns among scientific journal editors.

4 Comments

image: Defending Against Plagiarism

Defending Against Plagiarism

By | June 1, 2013

Publishers need to be proactive about detecting and deterring copied text.

5 Comments

image: Misconduct Around the Globe

Misconduct Around the Globe

By | June 1, 2013

Research misconduct is not limited to the developed world, but few countries anywhere are responding adequately.

3 Comments

image: Week in Review, May 13–17

Week in Review, May 13–17

By | May 17, 2013

Reading pathogen epigenomes; a new stem cell; dealing with research misconduct; monkey fossils; exploratory mice grow new neurons; watching metamorphosis

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Ethics Training in Science

Opinion: Ethics Training in Science

By | May 14, 2013

The NIH has required researchers to receive instruction about responsible conduct for more than 20 years, but misconduct is still on the rise.

9 Comments

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