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image: New TB Vaccine Fails Trial

New TB Vaccine Fails Trial

By | February 4, 2013

One of the most advanced tuberculosis vaccines has failed to protect infants from getting the disease in a clinical trial, but it may be effective in adults.

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image: A Chill Issue

A Chill Issue

By | February 1, 2013

The very cold, the merely chilled, and the colorful


image: Immune to Failure

Immune to Failure

By | February 1, 2013

With dogged persistence and an unwillingness to entertain defeat, Bruce Beutler discovered a receptor that powers the innate immune response to infections—and earned his share of a Nobel Prize.


image: Rhinoviruses Exposed

Rhinoviruses Exposed

By | February 1, 2013

Some of these insidious viruses expertly subvert the host immune system, allowing their unhindered proliferation.


image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2013

February 2013's selection of notable quotes


image: Review Retracted for Plagiarism

Review Retracted for Plagiarism

By | January 29, 2013

The authors of a review article on genome-wide association studies have retracted the paper due to “substantial textual overlap” with other sources.

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image: Renowned Retraction

Renowned Retraction

By | January 16, 2013

Authors retract a decade-old, highly-cited cancer study, admitting sloppy mistakes in the data analysis.

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image: Universal Flu Vaccines Charge Ahead

Universal Flu Vaccines Charge Ahead

By | January 14, 2013

Researchers and biotech companies are bringing a universal flu vaccine closer to reality.


image: Cancer Biomarker Studies Retracted

Cancer Biomarker Studies Retracted

By | January 3, 2013

Researchers from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have retracted two papers involving colon cancer biomarkers.


image: Expensive Retraction

Expensive Retraction

By | January 2, 2013

A publisher bills authors $650 to retract a twice-published paper.


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