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image: Moss Harbors Foreign Genes

Moss Harbors Foreign Genes

By | October 23, 2012

Genes from fungi, bacteria, and viruses may have helped mosses and other plants to colonize the land.


image: Natural-Born Doctors

Natural-Born Doctors

By | October 23, 2012

Bees, sheep, and chimps are just a few of the animals known to self-medicate. Can they teach us about maintaining our own health?


image: Opinion: Think Like Turing

Opinion: Think Like Turing

By | October 22, 2012

Biomedical researchers would benefit from emulating the logically rigorous reasoning of the late Alan Turing, British mathematician, computer scientist, and master cryptographer.


image: Biologist Ruffles Feathers on Facebook

Biologist Ruffles Feathers on Facebook

By | October 19, 2012

The blogosphere voices widespread condemnation for a sexist comment made by a researcher attending this week’s annual Society for Neuroscience conference.


image: Opinion: Singing about Science

Opinion: Singing about Science

By | October 4, 2012

Music videos could be helpful tools for science communication and education, but anti- and pseudoscience activists are also using this medium to spread their views.

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image: Retraction Remorse

Retraction Remorse

By | October 3, 2012

The journal that published and abruptly retracted the first study linking the lab-made virus XMRV to disease apologizes to the authors.


image: The Best of the 2012 Labbies

The Best of the 2012 Labbies

By | October 1, 2012

Check out image finalists and winners, as well as other memorable submissions to this year’s Labby Multimedia Awards.


image: The Salinella salve Mystery

The Salinella salve Mystery

By | October 1, 2012

Salinella salve, an organism described as a single layer of cells, ciliated on both inner and outer surfaces and surrounding…


image: Book Excerpt from <em>Living Color</em>

Book Excerpt from Living Color

By | October 1, 2012

In Chapter 3, "Out of the Tropics," author Nina G. Jablonski, explores the genes behind skin pigmentation and makes the distinction between color and race.


image: Gone Missing, circa 1892

Gone Missing, circa 1892

By | October 1, 2012

A unique organism sighted only once, more than a century ago, could shed light on the evolution of multicellularity—if it ever actually existed.


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