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image: Top 10 Retractions of 2013

Top 10 Retractions of 2013

By | December 30, 2013

A look at this year’s most memorable retractions

5 Comments

image: The Reasons Behind Retractions

The Reasons Behind Retractions

By | June 26, 2013

An analysis of 244 retraction notices shows how journals handle mistakes and fraudulent behavior.

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image: Gel Drama

Gel Drama

By | February 26, 2013

A mysterious case of proteomics plagiarism leads to an odd timeline for a retraction.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2013

February 2013's selection of notable quotes

2 Comments

image: Review Retracted for Plagiarism

Review Retracted for Plagiarism

By | January 29, 2013

The authors of a review article on genome-wide association studies have retracted the paper due to “substantial textual overlap” with other sources.

1 Comment

image: Renowned Retraction

Renowned Retraction

By | January 16, 2013

Authors retract a decade-old, highly-cited cancer study, admitting sloppy mistakes in the data analysis.

1 Comment

image: Cancer Biomarker Studies Retracted

Cancer Biomarker Studies Retracted

By | January 3, 2013

Researchers from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have retracted two papers involving colon cancer biomarkers.

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image: Expensive Retraction

Expensive Retraction

By | January 2, 2013

A publisher bills authors $650 to retract a twice-published paper.

2 Comments

image: Top Science Scandals of 2012

Top Science Scandals of 2012

By | December 17, 2012

This year’s roundup of bad behavior in the life sciences and new initiatives to prevent misconduct

20 Comments

image: Do Innocent Errors Cause Most Retractions?

Do Innocent Errors Cause Most Retractions?

By | November 2, 2012

Contrary to previous studies, a new publication finds that most retractions from scholarly literature are not due to misconduct.  

3 Comments

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