The Scientist

» antibody and ecology

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image: Outsmarting HIV

Outsmarting HIV

By | May 4, 2015

Small molecules that mimic the T-cell surface receptor CD4 could expose the virus to antibody-based immune responses.


image: Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

By | May 3, 2015

Species die-offs are expected to accelerate as greenhouse gases accumulate, according to a meta-analysis.


image: Bees Drawn to Pesticides

Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.


image: HIV Antibody Therapy

HIV Antibody Therapy

By | April 8, 2015

Delivering antibodies to HIV-infected people can lower levels of the virus, a study shows.


image: Investigating Irisin

Investigating Irisin

By | March 10, 2015

The discovery of nonspecific antibodies as key components of testing kits used in recent research suggests results touting the discovery of an “exercise hormone” may be invalid, according to a study.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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image: Blocking HIV

Blocking HIV

By | February 19, 2015

A synthetic antibody prevents infection in four monkeys injected with heavy doses of the virus.

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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image: Bats Make a Comeback

Bats Make a Comeback

By | December 22, 2014

Citizen-scientist data obtained through the U.K.’s National Bat Monitoring Programme show that populations of 10 bat species have stabilized or are growing.


image: Along Came a Spider

Along Came a Spider

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers are turning to venom peptides to protect crops from their most devastating pests.


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