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The publicly available database found nearly a third of samples included mutations targeted by either approved drugs or therapies in clinical trials. 

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image: Cancer Genomes

Cancer Genomes

By | April 1, 2017

April Scientist to Watch Angela Brooks of the University of California, Santa Cruz, discusses her search to find vulnerabilities buried within the genomes of cancer cells.

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image: Angela Brooks: Splicing Specialist

Angela Brooks: Splicing Specialist

By | April 1, 2017

At the University of California, Santa Cruz, the researcher combs the cancer genome, looking for weaknesses.

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image: AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

By | April 18, 2016

The genomics pioneer shares the sessions she most looks forward to at this year’s American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

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image: Direct-to-Consumer Liquid Biopsy

Direct-to-Consumer Liquid Biopsy

By | September 13, 2015

Some doctors advise shoppers to be skeptical of a newly marketed cancer diagnostic.

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image: Making Sense of the Tumor Exome

Making Sense of the Tumor Exome

By | May 18, 2014

An algorithm can pick out biologically and clinically meaningful variants from whole-exome sequences of tumors.

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image: Watson Challenges Cancer

Watson Challenges Cancer

By | March 20, 2014

The IBM supercomputer, famous for its game show performance, will aid in cloud-based analyses of genomic data.  

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image: Retracing Steps

Retracing Steps

By | November 11, 2013

Sage Bionetworks aims to show that transparency and sharing are key to ensuring research reproducibility.

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image: Bacterial DNA in Human Genomes

Bacterial DNA in Human Genomes

By | June 20, 2013

A new study finds strong evidence that bacteria can transfer genes into human genomes, especially in cancer cells.

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image: Identifying Spurious Cancer Mutations

Identifying Spurious Cancer Mutations

By | June 19, 2013

Researchers reveal why analyses of cancer-causing mutations are riddled with false positives and demonstrate a new approach that eliminates the problem.

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