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image: Inner Ear Undertakers

Inner Ear Undertakers

By | September 1, 2015

Support cells in the inner ear respond differently to two drugs that kill hair cells.

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image: Khaleel Razak: Hearing Engineer

Khaleel Razak: Hearing Engineer

By | September 1, 2015

Associate Professor, Department of Psychology University of California, Riverside. Age: 44

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image: Lending an Ear

Lending an Ear

By | September 1, 2015

Until recently, auditory brainstem implants have been restricted to patients with tumors on their auditory nerves.

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image: The Ears Have It

The Ears Have It

By | September 1, 2015

A teaching obligation in graduate school introduced James Hudspeth to a career focused on how vertebrates sense sounds.

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image: The Regenerators

The Regenerators

By | September 1, 2015

A molecular signature makes it possible to trace the details of hair cell replacement in the mammalian inner ear.

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image: Whaling Specimens, 1930s

Whaling Specimens, 1930s

By | September 1, 2015

Fetal specimens collected by commercial whalers offer insights into how whales may have evolved their specialized hearing organs.

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image: Aural History

Aural History

By | September 1, 2015

The form and function of the ears of modern land vertebrates cannot be understood without knowing how they evolved.

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image: Hearing Help

Hearing Help

By | September 1, 2015

For decades, the only remedies for hearing loss were devices such as hearing aids or cochlear implants. Now, the first pharmaceutical treatments may be on the way.  

2 Comments

image: The Great Big Clean-Up

The Great Big Clean-Up

By | September 1, 2015

From tossing out cross-contaminated cell lines to flagging genomic misnomers, a push is on to tidy up biomedical research.

5 Comments

image: Oliver Sacks Dies

Oliver Sacks Dies

By | August 31, 2015

The neurologist and author had written about his recent experiences being “face to face with dying.”

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