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image: The Regenerators

The Regenerators

By | September 1, 2015

A molecular signature makes it possible to trace the details of hair cell replacement in the mammalian inner ear.

1 Comment

image: Whaling Specimens, 1930s

Whaling Specimens, 1930s

By | September 1, 2015

Fetal specimens collected by commercial whalers offer insights into how whales may have evolved their specialized hearing organs.

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image: Aural History

Aural History

By | September 1, 2015

The form and function of the ears of modern land vertebrates cannot be understood without knowing how they evolved.

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image: Hearing Help

Hearing Help

By | September 1, 2015

For decades, the only remedies for hearing loss were devices such as hearing aids or cochlear implants. Now, the first pharmaceutical treatments may be on the way.  

2 Comments

image: The Great Big Clean-Up

The Great Big Clean-Up

By | September 1, 2015

From tossing out cross-contaminated cell lines to flagging genomic misnomers, a push is on to tidy up biomedical research.

5 Comments

image: Microorganisms Make a House a Home?

Microorganisms Make a House a Home?

By | August 26, 2015

The fungal and bacterial communities in household dust can reveal some details about a building’s inhabitants.

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image: Bacteria to Blame?

Bacteria to Blame?

By | August 18, 2015

T cells activated in the microbe-dense gut can spark an autoimmune eye disease, a study shows. 

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image: The Search for Persisters

The Search for Persisters

By | August 11, 2015

Lyme disease–causing bacteria can outmaneuver antibiotics in vitro and manipulate the mouse immune system.

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image: Subway Microbiome Study Revised

Subway Microbiome Study Revised

By | August 4, 2015

Researchers tone down their highly publicized study that reported the presence of deadly pathogens on New York City subways.

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image: TB Traces

TB Traces

By | August 1, 2015

Take a trip to the mummy museum in Vác, Hungary, to see the human remains that helped researchers learn more about the origins of tuberculosis in Europe.

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