The Scientist

» hearing and developmental biology

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image: Inner Ear Undertakers

Inner Ear Undertakers

By | September 1, 2015

Support cells in the inner ear respond differently to two drugs that kill hair cells.

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image: Khaleel Razak: Hearing Engineer

Khaleel Razak: Hearing Engineer

By | September 1, 2015

Associate Professor, Department of Psychology University of California, Riverside. Age: 44

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image: The Ears Have It

The Ears Have It

By | September 1, 2015

A teaching obligation in graduate school introduced James Hudspeth to a career focused on how vertebrates sense sounds.

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image: The Regenerators

The Regenerators

By | September 1, 2015

A molecular signature makes it possible to trace the details of hair cell replacement in the mammalian inner ear.

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image: Whaling Specimens, 1930s

Whaling Specimens, 1930s

By | September 1, 2015

Fetal specimens collected by commercial whalers offer insights into how whales may have evolved their specialized hearing organs.

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image: Aural History

Aural History

By | September 1, 2015

The form and function of the ears of modern land vertebrates cannot be understood without knowing how they evolved.

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image: Hearing Help

Hearing Help

By | September 1, 2015

For decades, the only remedies for hearing loss were devices such as hearing aids or cochlear implants. Now, the first pharmaceutical treatments may be on the way.  

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image: Q&A: Placental Ponderings

Q&A: Placental Ponderings

By | August 27, 2015

Biologist Christopher Coe answers readers’ questions about the prescient organ.

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image: A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865

A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865

By | August 1, 2015

This year marks the 150th anniversary of an autopsy report describing the first known case of a sexual development disorder.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | August 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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