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image: Brain-Training Firm, FTC Settle

Brain-Training Firm, FTC Settle

By | January 6, 2016

San Francisco-based Lumos Labs, creator of the brain-training program Lumosity, will pay $2 million to settle deceptive-advertising charges raised by the US Federal Trade Commission.

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image: Disease-Linked Genes Questioned

Disease-Linked Genes Questioned

By | January 6, 2016

Many patients with genetic variations linked to cardiac disorders do not exhibit any symptoms, raising concerns about the validity of incidental findings of genetic tests.

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image: TS Picks: CRISPR Patent Edition

TS Picks: CRISPR Patent Edition

By | January 5, 2016

A challenge to the first CRISPR patent just got teeth.

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image: CRISPR Improves Disease in Adult Mice

CRISPR Improves Disease in Adult Mice

By | January 4, 2016

Three groups of researchers used the gene-editing method to restore a protein deficient in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

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image: All Together Now

All Together Now

By | January 1, 2016

Understanding the biological roots of cooperation might help resolve some of the biggest scientific challenges we face.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>NeuroLogic</em>

Book Excerpt from NeuroLogic

By | January 1, 2016

In the introduction to the book, author Eliezer J. Sternberg illustrates what can happen when the brain’s processing centers are damaged.

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image: Christie Fowler: Addicted to Research

Christie Fowler: Addicted to Research

By | January 1, 2016

Assistant Professor, Department of Neurobiology and Behavior University of California, Irvine. Age: 39

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | January 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Flavor Savors

Flavor Savors

By | January 1, 2016

Odors experienced via the mouth are essential to our sense of taste.

2 Comments

image: Logically Illogical

Logically Illogical

By | January 1, 2016

The most bizarre behaviors often make perfect sense in the minds of the mentally ill.

3 Comments

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