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image: Reactions to the March for Science

Reactions to the March for Science

By | April 25, 2017

The Scientist’s Bob Grant caught up with demonstrators who participated in the March for Science in Washington, DC, on April 22.

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image: Trump to Hold Annual Science Fair

Trump to Hold Annual Science Fair

By | April 25, 2017

The president has announced that he will continue the Obama-era tradition of showcasing school children’s science projects at the White House.

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The state’s board of education approves new standards that ease up on having students dig into scientific issues relevant to “intelligent design” arguments.

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image: <em>The Scientist</em> at the March for Science in Washington, DC: April 22, 2017

The Scientist at the March for Science in Washington, DC: April 22, 2017

By and | April 23, 2017

Thousands of scientists and science supporters marched from the Washington Monument to the US Capitol this weekend.

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image: Marching Into an Uncertain Future

Marching Into an Uncertain Future

By | April 20, 2017

Can professional organizations and societies parlay the groundswell of support culminating in this weekend’s March for Science into more-effective science advocacy?

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image: TS Picks: April 20, 2017

TS Picks: April 20, 2017

By | April 20, 2017

March for Science edition

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A mouse study reveals a causal link between changes in intestinal microbiota and increasing inflammation as the rodents age.

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Mice exposed to low doses of penicillin in utero or as young pups exhibited long-term behavioral differences not seen in their non-exposed counterparts, according to a study.

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image: New Giant Virus Group Reported

New Giant Virus Group Reported

By | April 6, 2017

A genomic analysis of “Klosneuviruses” suggests that they evolved from small viruses that accumulated genetic material over time, but not all virologists are convinced. 

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Recolonizing middle-aged animals with bacteria from younger ones kept killifish alive longer than usual, researchers report.

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