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image: Similar Data, Different Conclusions

Similar Data, Different Conclusions

By | February 23, 2016

By tweaking certain conditions of a long-running experiment on E. coli, scientists found that some bacteria could be prompted to express a mutant phenotype sooner, without the “generation of new genetic information.” The resulting debate—whether the data support evolutionary theory—is more about semantics than science.

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image: Breast Milk Sugars Support Infant Gut Health

Breast Milk Sugars Support Infant Gut Health

By | February 18, 2016

Oligosaccharides found in breast milk stimulate the activity of gut bacteria, promoting growth in two animal models of infant malnutrition.

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image: Obama Submits Science-Boosting Budget

Obama Submits Science-Boosting Budget

By | February 10, 2016

But some critics say the President relies too heavily on mandatory funding to support the biomedical research enterprise.

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image: Embryo Editing Gets Green Light in U.K.

Embryo Editing Gets Green Light in U.K.

By | February 2, 2016

Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute in London will use CRISPR/Cas9 to modify genes in early human embryos.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2016

February 2016's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Fungi Within

The Fungi Within

By | February 1, 2016

Diverse fungal species live in and on the human body.

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image: The Mycobiome

The Mycobiome

By | February 1, 2016

The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

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image: Counting Cells

Counting Cells

By | January 11, 2016

A person likely carries the same number of human and microbial cells, according to a new estimate.

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image: All Together Now

All Together Now

By | January 1, 2016

Understanding the biological roots of cooperation might help resolve some of the biggest scientific challenges we face.

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