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Speaking of Science

By | May 1, 2013

May 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: We're All Connected

We're All Connected

By | May 1, 2013

A look at some of biology’s communication networks

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Live Wires

By | May 1, 2013

Discoveries of microbial communities that transfer electrons between cells and across relatively long distances are launching a new field of microbiology.

3 Comments

image: Autism-Lyme Correlation Debunked

Autism-Lyme Correlation Debunked

By | April 30, 2013

Researchers find zero evidence for Lyme-induced autism.

11 Comments

image: Week in Review: April 22–26

Week in Review: April 22–26

By | April 26, 2013

Double helix celebrates 60; detecting calories without taste; bacteria vs. tumor; perceptual consciousness in babies

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image: Government Revises Financial Disclosure Rules

Government Revises Financial Disclosure Rules

By | April 18, 2013

Researchers welcome a new ruling saying that financial holdings will no longer need to be published in an online database.

1 Comment

image: Virus Versus Bacteria

Virus Versus Bacteria

By | April 17, 2013

A newly developed drug, modeled after a bacteria-infecting virus, is less likely to become antibiotic resistant.

1 Comment

image: Canada Investigates Scientist Muzzling

Canada Investigates Scientist Muzzling

By | April 4, 2013

The Canadian information commissioner will investigate mounting claims that the government is stifling communication between federal scientists and the press.

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image: Opinion: Canadian Science Under Attack

Opinion: Canadian Science Under Attack

By | April 2, 2013

Government policies are shuttering research facilities while muzzling federal researchers by dissuading them from talking to the press, participating in international collaborations, or publishing their work.

6 Comments

image: Border Buffers

Border Buffers

By | April 1, 2013

Protected areas help to conserve imperiled tropical forests, but many are struggling to sustain their resident species.

0 Comments

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