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image: Disputes Over Text-Mining

Disputes Over Text-Mining

By | March 21, 2013

Computer programs that trawl research papers can reveal important large-scale patterns and facilitate further research, but publishers are wary.

2 Comments

image: The Upside of Suicide

The Upside of Suicide

By | March 20, 2013

Researchers show that a bacterium’s self-sacrifice can benefit its community, even when the members are not strongly related.

4 Comments

image: Fish Brain on Film

Fish Brain on Film

By | March 19, 2013

Improvements in light-sheet microscopy enable real-time activity imaging of almost every neuron in the brain of zebrafish larvae.

0 Comments

image: Microbes Thrive in Deepest Ocean

Microbes Thrive in Deepest Ocean

By | March 17, 2013

Researchers find remarkably active bacteria in the Mariana Trench, where they live under pressure 1,000 times greater than at the surface.

4 Comments

image: Gov’t Science and the Media

Gov’t Science and the Media

By | March 15, 2013

Federal research agencies, such as the NIH, EPA, and NSF, are improving communication between their scientists and journalists, but most can do better.

1 Comment

image: Life Below the Seabed

Life Below the Seabed

By | March 14, 2013

Rock samples from deep within the Earth’s oceanic crust contain chemosynthetic microbial life.

1 Comment

image: Roller Derby Players Share Germs

Roller Derby Players Share Germs

By | March 14, 2013

Team member and opponents exchange microbes by slamming into each others’ shoulders during the game.

1 Comment

image: Bee Venom for HIV Prevention

Bee Venom for HIV Prevention

By | March 12, 2013

Nanoparticles coated with a toxin found in bee venom can destroy HIV while leaving surrounding cells intact.

1 Comment

image: Gov’t Science Integrity Measures Lackluster

Gov’t Science Integrity Measures Lackluster

By | March 11, 2013

A new analysis finds that while some federal agencies have made strides in safeguarding the validity of their research, more work needs to be done.

1 Comment

image: Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes

Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes

By | March 7, 2013

A red alga appears to have adapted to extremely hot, acidic environments by collecting genes from bacteria and archaea.

0 Comments

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