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image: Science Oversight in the U.K.

Science Oversight in the U.K.

By | November 23, 2015

An independent reviewer suggests that England’s seven research councils, which award government research funding, should be put under the umbrella of a new agency that would manage the grant money.

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image: How Gastric Bypass Can Kill Sugar Cravings

How Gastric Bypass Can Kill Sugar Cravings

By | November 19, 2015

A type of bariatric surgery eliminates gut-to-brain signals that trigger sugar highs, a mouse study shows.  

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image: Brain Fold Tied to Hallucinations

Brain Fold Tied to Hallucinations

By | November 19, 2015

A shorter crease in the medial prefrontal cortex is linked with a higher risk of schizophrenics experiencing hallucinations.

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image: EC Science Advisers Announced

EC Science Advisers Announced

By | November 10, 2015

The European Commission names seven scientists to top science policy–advising positions. 

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image: Understanding Global Migration

Understanding Global Migration

By | November 4, 2015

World Science Forum panelists discuss how scientists can better decipher the factors that drive global migration in order to affect policy change.

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image: Appetite, Obesity, and the Brain

Appetite, Obesity, and the Brain

By | November 1, 2015

How the foods that make us fattest are not that different from heroin and cocaine

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image: Embracing the Unknown

Embracing the Unknown

By | November 1, 2015

Researchers are showing that ambiguity can be essential to brain development.

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image: Heady Stuff

Heady Stuff

By | November 1, 2015

New research on how fat influences brain neuronal activity

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image: Remote Mind Control

Remote Mind Control

By | November 1, 2015

Using chemogenetic tools to spur the brain into action

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image: Rewarding Companions

Rewarding Companions

By | October 26, 2015

Oxytocin and social contact together modulate endocannabinoid activity in the mouse brain, which could help explain the prosocial effects of marijuana use. 

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