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image: FDA Approves Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy

FDA Approves Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy

By | May 23, 2016

The US Food and Drug Administration greenlights Roche’s Tecentriq, which blocks a protein that obstructs the immune system’s ability to fight cancer.

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image: House Passes Watered-Down Zika Aid Bill

House Passes Watered-Down Zika Aid Bill

By | May 20, 2016

The legislation allocates only $622 million to the effort to help the country respond to the impending spread of the mosquito-borne disease.

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Certain drugs could worsen graft-versus-host disease in stem cell transplant patients, scientists show.

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image: Stem Cell Rules Tackle Human Embryo Editing

Stem Cell Rules Tackle Human Embryo Editing

By | May 17, 2016

A set of international stem cell guidelines recommends that oversight committees at research institutions oversee all research on embryos.

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image: Tasmanian Devil Antibodies Fight Cancer

Tasmanian Devil Antibodies Fight Cancer

By | May 9, 2016

The proteins could be the key to stopping the transmissible facial tumor disease that is threatening the species.

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image: Breast Milk Primes Gut for Microbes

Breast Milk Primes Gut for Microbes

By | May 5, 2016

Maternal antibodies engender a receptive gut environment for beneficial bacteria in newborn mice.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | May 1, 2016

May 2016's selection of notable quotes

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image: Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

By | April 21, 2016

Housing laboratory mice with those reared in a pet store makes the lab rodents’ immune systems more similar to those of people.

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image: AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

By | April 18, 2016

The genomics pioneer shares the sessions she most looks forward to at this year’s American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

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image: Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

By | April 7, 2016

The immune cells—known for clearing dead cells—also chew up live progenitors in neurogenic regions of mouse brains. 

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