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image: The Rebirth of DIYbio

The Rebirth of DIYbio

By | March 1, 2013

Do-it-yourself science is likely as old as science itself, driven by an inherent curiosity about the world around us.

1 Comment

image: Do-It-Yourself Medicine

Do-It-Yourself Medicine

By | March 1, 2013

Patients are sidestepping clinical research and using themselves as guinea pigs to test new treatments for fatal diseases. Will they hurt themselves, or science?

9 Comments

image: China Admits to “Cancer Villages”

China Admits to “Cancer Villages”

By | February 25, 2013

Officials in the most populous nation on Earth have finally owned up to clusters of the disease around areas beset by industrial waste and other pollutants.

0 Comments

image: Stem Cell Trial Nearly Approved

Stem Cell Trial Nearly Approved

By | February 15, 2013

The first human trial of a treatment using induced pluripotent stem cells has received conditional approval from an institutional review board in Japan.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: From Polymerase to Politics

Opinion: From Polymerase to Politics

By | February 11, 2013

Why so few scientists make the leap to policy-making positions, and why more should give it a try

0 Comments

image: Stem Cells: Safe Haven For TB

Stem Cells: Safe Haven For TB

By | February 5, 2013

Tuberculosis bacteria find shelter from drugs and the body’s defenses in bone marrow stem cells.

2 Comments

image: Opinion: Health Booth 2020

Opinion: Health Booth 2020

By | February 4, 2013

Using a SMART card containing your genetic information and medical history, you could one day soon be diagnosed and treated for all kinds of diseases at an ATM-style kiosk.

3 Comments

image: Energy Secretary to Step Down

Energy Secretary to Step Down

By | February 4, 2013

After a 4-year stretch as US Energy Secretary, during which he fought to fund research on clean energy technology, Steven Chu has announced his resignation.

0 Comments

image: A Chill Issue

A Chill Issue

By | February 1, 2013

The very cold, the merely chilled, and the colorful

0 Comments

image: Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

By | February 1, 2013

As cholera first tore through the Europe in the mid-19th century, people tried anything to prevent the deadly disease. Then science stepped in.

2 Comments

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