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image: It’s Raining Mice

It’s Raining Mice

By | May 1, 2012

A new brown tree snake control strategy takes to the skies as scientists scatter toxic rodents over Guam’s forest canopy.

10 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | May 1, 2012

May 2012's selection of notable quotes

8 Comments

image: Pigeon GPS Identified

Pigeon GPS Identified

By | April 26, 2012

A population of neurons in pigeon brains encodes direction, intensity, and polarity of the Earth’s magnetic field.

32 Comments

image: Embryonic Stem Cells in Court Again

Embryonic Stem Cells in Court Again

By | April 24, 2012

A judicial technicality may decide the fate of NIH-funded human embryonic stem cell research.

2 Comments

image: Melting Ice Releases Ancient Microbes

Melting Ice Releases Ancient Microbes

By | April 19, 2012

Living cells escaping from Antarctic glaciers could speed global warming and affect marine life.

6 Comments

image: White House Weighs in on H5N1

White House Weighs in on H5N1

By | April 18, 2012

Science adviser John Holdren speaks out about how the Presidential Administration is handling the controversial research that rendered avian flu transmissible between ferrets.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Data to Knowledge to Action

Opinion: Data to Knowledge to Action

By | April 18, 2012

Introducing DELSA Global, a community initiative to connect experts, share data, and democratize science.

2 Comments

image: Scottish DNA Unexpectedly Diverse

Scottish DNA Unexpectedly Diverse

By | April 18, 2012

Geography might explain the treasure trove of genetic diversity among Scots.

2 Comments

image: Spotted: Emperor Penguins

Spotted: Emperor Penguins

By | April 17, 2012

Satellites are used to count the number of penguins living in Antarctica.

0 Comments

image: Monkeys “Read” Writing

Monkeys “Read” Writing

By | April 12, 2012

Baboons are able to distinguish printed English words from nonsense sequences of letters—the first step in the reading process.

0 Comments

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