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Speaking of Science

By | December 1, 2015

December 2015's selection of notable quotes

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Urban Owl-Fitters

By | December 1, 2015

How birds with an innate propensity for living among humans are establishing populations in cities

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Pumpkins Saved By People?

By | November 25, 2015

Domestication may have saved pumpkins, gourds, and squash as seed dispersers like the mastodon went extinct. 

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Farming Sped Eurasian Evolution

By | November 24, 2015

New clues from ancient DNA reveal the remarkable effect of agriculture on adaptation in Stone Age humans who lived across Europe.

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Science Oversight in the U.K.

By | November 23, 2015

An independent reviewer suggests that England’s seven research councils, which award government research funding, should be put under the umbrella of a new agency that would manage the grant money.

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Genome Digest

By | November 19, 2015

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Rethinking the Rise of Mammals

Rethinking the Rise of Mammals

By | November 16, 2015

Mammals diversified 30 million years later than previously estimated, according to a new analysis of an ancient fossil.

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EC Science Advisers Announced

By | November 10, 2015

The European Commission names seven scientists to top science policy–advising positions. 

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Understanding Global Migration

By | November 4, 2015

World Science Forum panelists discuss how scientists can better decipher the factors that drive global migration in order to affect policy change.

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image: A Tiny Missing Link?

A Tiny Missing Link?

By | November 2, 2015

The common ancestor of all apes, including great apes and humans, may have been not-so-great in stature.

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