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image: When Stop Means Go

When Stop Means Go

By | May 22, 2014

A survey of trillions of base pairs of microbial DNA reveals a considerable degree of stop codon reassignment.

2 Comments

image: Border Collies vs. <em>E. coli</em>

Border Collies vs. E. coli

By | May 21, 2014

A study shows that the herding dogs can be an effective means of controlling bacterial infections spread by seagulls.

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image: Characterizing the “Healthy” Vagina

Characterizing the “Healthy” Vagina

By | May 19, 2014

The overly simplistic notion of a Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiome is giving way to an appreciation of diverse and dynamic bacterial communities.

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image: Hear Ye, Hear Ye

Hear Ye, Hear Ye

By | May 1, 2014

Tools for tracking quorum-sensing signals in bacterial colonies

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image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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image: Sequencing the Tree of Life

Sequencing the Tree of Life

By | April 24, 2014

Charting the progress of the various large-scale genome-sequencing projects as researchers working separately on their chosen species begin to pool analytical resources

7 Comments

image: Microbe’s Diversity Is Vast, Ancient

Microbe’s Diversity Is Vast, Ancient

By | April 24, 2014

A marine cyanobacterium possesses astounding genomic diversity, yet still organizes into distinct subpopulations that have likely persisted for ages.

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image: Money Microbiome

Money Microbiome

By | April 24, 2014

Swabbing cash circulating in New York City reveals more than 3,000 different types of bacteria.

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image: Microbiome Influences

Microbiome Influences

By | April 22, 2014

Researchers find that gender, education level, and breastfeeding can affect humans’ commensal microbial communities.

2 Comments

image: Dermatologically Derived

Dermatologically Derived

By | April 1, 2014

Inspired by turkey skin, researchers devise a bacteriophage-based sensor whose color changes upon binding specific molecules.

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