The Scientist

» virology and microbiology

Most Recent

image: Underground Immunity

Underground Immunity

By | July 16, 2015

Arabidopsis thaliana defense hormones shape the plant’s root microbiome. 

0 Comments

image: Microbiome Teams Up Against <em>C. diff</em>

Microbiome Teams Up Against C. diff

By | July 14, 2015

Researchers build a mathematical model that can predict whether a mouse will be infected by Clostridium difficile based on the microbes found in its GI tract.

1 Comment

image: Evolution of Kin Discrimination

Evolution of Kin Discrimination

By | July 6, 2015

A bacterium’s ability to distinguish self from non-self can arise spontaneously, a study shows, reigniting questions of whether the trait can be considered an adaptation.

3 Comments

image: Novel Hantavirus Infection Method

Novel Hantavirus Infection Method

By | July 3, 2015

Researchers find that the potentially deadly virus uses cholesterol to gain access to cells.

0 Comments

image: Cuba Ends Mother-To-Child HIV

Cuba Ends Mother-To-Child HIV

By | July 2, 2015

The Caribbean nation is the first to effectively eliminate the prenatal transmission of syphilis and the virus that causes AIDS, according to the World Health Organization.

0 Comments

image: Gutless Worm

Gutless Worm

By | July 1, 2015

Meet the digestive tract–lacking oligochaete that has fueled Max Planck researcher Nicole Dubilier’s interest in symbiosis and marine science.

0 Comments

image: Monkey Business

Monkey Business

By | July 1, 2015

Travel to Bangladesh to meet the Bedey, a band of river nomads, and their trained macaques, which perform shows and seldom transmit a monkey virus to their handlers.

0 Comments

image: Sold on Symbiosis

Sold on Symbiosis

By | July 1, 2015

A love of the ocean lured Nicole Dubilier into science; gutless sea worms and their nurturing bacterial symbionts keep her at the leading edge of marine microbiology.

0 Comments

image: Sponging Up Phosphorus

Sponging Up Phosphorus

By | July 1, 2015

Symbiotic bacteria in Caribbean reef sponges store polyphosphate granules, possibly explaining why phosphorous is so scarce in coral reef ecosystems.

1 Comment

image: The Lies That Scars Tell

The Lies That Scars Tell

By | July 1, 2015

Macaque trainers in Bangladesh are often bitten by their monkeys, but rarely infected by a particular simian retrovirus.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Gut Microbes Linked to Neurodegenerative Disease
  2. Infant Microbiome: Vaginal Delivery Versus C-Section
  3. Top 10 Innovations 2016
    Features Top 10 Innovations 2016

    This year’s list of winners celebrates both large leaps and small (but important) steps in life science technology.

  4. Opinion: WHO’s Silence on Cannabis
Rockland