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image: Esteemed Virologist Dies

Esteemed Virologist Dies

By | December 7, 2015

Richard Johnson, a pioneer in research on central nervous system infections, died last month at age 84.

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image: <em>The Scientist</em> on The Pulse, December 4

The Scientist on The Pulse, December 4

By | December 4, 2015

Are precision gene editing technologies, such as CRISPR, ready for prime time?

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image: Week in Review: November 30–December 4

Week in Review: November 30–December 4

By | December 4, 2015

Historic meeting on human gene editing; signs of obesity found in sperm epigenome; top 10 innovations of 2015; dealing with retractions

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image: Let’s Talk Human Engineering

Let’s Talk Human Engineering

By | December 3, 2015

Experts continue to discuss the logistics and ethical considerations of editing human genomes at a historic meeting in Washington, DC. 

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2015

Welcome to the Microbiome, The Paradox of Evolution, Newton's Apple, and Dawn of the Neuron.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | December 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Family Ties

Family Ties

By | December 1, 2015

There’s more to inheritance than genes.

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image: Sneeze O'Clock

Sneeze O'Clock

By | December 1, 2015

Is a nasal circadian clock to blame for allergy symptoms flaring up in the morning?

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | December 1, 2015

December 2015's selection of notable quotes

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image: BRCA1 Linked to Alzheimer’s

BRCA1 Linked to Alzheimer’s

By | November 30, 2015

The cancer-related protein BRCA1 is important for learning and memory in mice and is depleted in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, according to a study.

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