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The Scientist

» virology, immunology and ecology

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image: Old New Species

Old New Species

By | November 20, 2012

Decades can pass between the discovery of a new animal or plant and its official debut in the scientific literature.

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image: No Sex Required

No Sex Required

By | November 19, 2012

An all-female species, distantly related to flatworms, steals all of genetic material it needs to diversify its genome.

2 Comments

image: Ebola from Pigs to Monkeys

Ebola from Pigs to Monkeys

By | November 15, 2012

A deadly Ebola virus can spread from pigs to monkeys without direct contact, pointing to pig farms as a possible contributor to outbreaks.

2 Comments

image: Inflammation for Regeneration

Inflammation for Regeneration

By | November 8, 2012

Inflammatory signals in injured zebrafish brains promote the growth of new neurons.

1 Comment

image: Little Fish in a Big Pond

Little Fish in a Big Pond

By | November 1, 2012

Continued overfishing of forage fish such as sardines and herring can result in devastating ecological and economic outcomes.

1 Comment

image: Microbial Awakening

Microbial Awakening

By | November 1, 2012

Successive awakening of soil microbes drives a huge pulse of CO2 following the first rain after a dry summer.

1 Comment

image: The Birthday Conference

The Birthday Conference

By | November 1, 2012

Snapshots from an annual meeting that celebrates the birth of a prominent biologist

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image: A Celebrated Symposium

A Celebrated Symposium

By | November 1, 2012

A conference, started 10 years ago partly as a disease ecologist’s birthday party, has become one of the most valued meetings in the field.  

0 Comments

image: Viral Skeleton

Viral Skeleton

By | November 1, 2012

A newly discovered family of tubulins—members of the cytoskeleton—encoded by bacteriophages plays a role in arranging the location of DNA within virus’s bacterial host.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Fishy Deaths

Opinion: Fishy Deaths

By | October 29, 2012

Record fish die-offs in the Midwest call for a fresh look at how humans are disrupting the planet’s essential water cycle.

1 Comment

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