The Scientist

» virology, culture and microbiology

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image: Have Herpes, Will Travel

Have Herpes, Will Travel

By | April 1, 2014

Insight into the geographical clustering of a viral genome comes from an unexpected source.

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Speaking of Science

By | April 1, 2014

April 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Working Vacation

The Working Vacation

By | April 1, 2014

Sabbaticals are one of the perks of the academic life. They may seem daunting to implement, but the time away could prove invaluable to your career.  

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image: Ballroom Brainwaves

Ballroom Brainwaves

By | March 28, 2014

A neuroscientist studies the brains of tango dancers in an attempt to understand interpersonal connectedness.

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image: Gut Microbes Gobble Cocoa

Gut Microbes Gobble Cocoa

By | March 19, 2014

Commensal bacteria that populate the human gastrointestinal tract help digest dark chocolate, releasing anti-inflammatory compounds, researchers report.

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image: Week in Review: March 3–7

Week in Review: March 3–7

By | March 7, 2014

The gene behind a butterfly’s mimicry; the evolution of adipose fins; bacteria and bowel cancer; plants lacking plastid genomes

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image: Bacteria’s Role in Bowel Cancer

Bacteria’s Role in Bowel Cancer

By | March 3, 2014

The development of serrated polyps depends on bacteria present in the gut, a mouse study shows.  

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Lucky Planet</em>

Book Excerpt from Lucky Planet

By | March 1, 2014

In the book's prologue, author David Waltham compares a fictitious planet to Earth, highlighting the biologically supportive luck that our planet has enjoyed.

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Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2014

The Sixth Extinction, Joy, Guilt, Anger, Love, Ha! The Science of When we Laugh and Why, and Ten Thousand Birds

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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