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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | May 1, 2017

Climate change, research funding, race, and much more

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Studies of infected rhesus monkeys reveal the virus’s long-term hiding places in the body.

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The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

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image: Viral Trigger for Celiac Disease?

Viral Trigger for Celiac Disease?

By | April 6, 2017

A common, seemingly benign human virus can trigger an immune response that leads to celiac disease in a mouse model, researchers show. 

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | April 1, 2017

Eugene Garfield, the cancer moonshot, employee genetic testing, and more

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image: Anti-Flavivirus Antibodies Enhance Zika Infection in Mice

Anti-Flavivirus Antibodies Enhance Zika Infection in Mice

By | March 30, 2017

Researchers report evidence of antibody-dependent enhancement in a Zika-infected, immunocompromised mouse model.

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image: Experimental MERS Treatments Target Host Cell Receptor

Experimental MERS Treatments Target Host Cell Receptor

By | March 30, 2017

Researchers are searching for ways to prevent the coronavirus from attaching to DPP-4 receptors, blocking it from invading and replicating within host cells.

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image: Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

By | March 23, 2017

Murine neural tubes, with each image highlighting a different embryonic tissue type (blue). The neural tube itself (left) grows into the brain, spine, and nerves, while the mesoderm (middle) develops into other organs, and the ectoderm (right) forms skin, teeth, and hair.

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image: San People Write Ethical Code for Research

San People Write Ethical Code for Research

By | March 21, 2017

With lifestyles similar to our hunter-gatherer ancestors, the San people of Southern Africa are popular study subjects.

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