The Scientist

» virology, culture and developmental biology

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Speaking of Science

By | August 1, 2013

August 2013's selection of notable quotes

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New Giant Viruses Break Records

By | July 22, 2013

Two newly discovered giant viruses are bigger than many bacteria and carry massive and largely unique genomes that hint at new branches of life.

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A Fly on the Wall

By | July 19, 2013

A geneticist-turned-filmmaker is making a movie set in Columbia University’s famous Fly Room, where the foundations for modern genetics were laid.

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Beach Reading

By | July 1, 2013

A vacation from your lab doesn’t have to mean a break from fascinating developments on the life science front.

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In Chapter 3, “From Mating to Conception,” author Robert Martin explores the question of why humans and other primates frequently engage in sexual intercourse when females are not fertile.

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Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2013

Denial, Probably Approximately Correct, Permanent Present Tense, and Against Their Will

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Contributors

By | July 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the July 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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Sea Bugs

By | July 1, 2013

Ocean viruses can impact marine ecosystems in several ways.

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Widening the Fertile Window

By | July 1, 2013

Women may be able to store viable sperm for longer than a week, thus contributing to apparent variability in pregnancy lengths.

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image: An Ocean of Viruses

An Ocean of Viruses

By | July 1, 2013

Viruses abound in the world’s oceans, yet researchers are only beginning to understand how they affect life and chemistry from the water’s surface to the sea floor.

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