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image: Ciliates Are Genetic-Code Deviants

Ciliates Are Genetic-Code Deviants

By | October 1, 2016

Traditional stop codons have a double meaning in the protozoans' mRNA, sometimes calling for an amino acid during translation.

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image: Curious George

Curious George

By | October 1, 2016

George Church has consistently positioned himself at genomics’ leading edge.

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image: Protozoans Found With No Dedicated Stop Codons

Protozoans Found With No Dedicated Stop Codons

By | October 1, 2016

Some ciliates use the same trio of nucleotides to code for an amino acid and to stop translation.

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image: Science History: The First Transgenic <em>Arabidopsis</em>

Science History: The First Transgenic Arabidopsis

By | October 1, 2016

Tweaks to a transformation protocol in 1986 cemented the little plant's mighty role in plant genetics research.

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image: Some Human Cancers Exhibit Low-grade Inflammation

Some Human Cancers Exhibit Low-grade Inflammation

By | October 1, 2016

NSAIDs reduce this "parainflammation," hinting at how they help lower cancer risk.

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image: Techniques for Assessing Genomic Copy Number Variations

Techniques for Assessing Genomic Copy Number Variations

By | October 1, 2016

As the importance of genomic copy number variations for health and disease becomes clearer, researchers are creating new ways to detect these changes in the genome.

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image: The Narcissistic Scientist

The Narcissistic Scientist

By | October 1, 2016

Are leading researchers driven more by the quest for knowledge or the pursuit of fame?

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image: Thirty Years of Lab Safety

Thirty Years of Lab Safety

By | October 1, 2016

From mouth pipetting to automated liquid handling, life-science labs have gotten much safer over the past three decades.

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image: DNA Sequencing: From Tedious to Automatic

DNA Sequencing: From Tedious to Automatic

By | October 1, 2016

Sequencing has gone from a laborious manual task costing thousands of dollars to a quick and cheap practice that is standard for many laboratories.

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image: Scientists Catch Translation in the Act

Scientists Catch Translation in the Act

By | October 1, 2016

Newly developed techniques from four different groups rely on the same basic steps to track translation in live cells.

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