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image: 2014’s Best in Multimedia

2014’s Best in Multimedia

By | December 28, 2014

The Scientist’s standout videos and slideshows of the year

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image: Repurposed Retroviruses

Repurposed Retroviruses

By | December 18, 2014

B cells have commandeered ancient viral sequences in the genome to transmit antigen signals.

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image: Reprogramming Redux

Reprogramming Redux

By | December 18, 2014

Can mechanical forces alone be manipulated to create stem-like cells?

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image: Mining Existing Drugs for Ebola Treatments

Mining Existing Drugs for Ebola Treatments

By | December 17, 2014

Researchers hope to repurpose already-approved drugs into potential anti-Ebola therapies.

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image: Honeybee Compound for Hair Loss?

Honeybee Compound for Hair Loss?

By | December 11, 2014

Propolis, a natural product used by honeybees to repair their hives, stimulates hair growth in shaved mice.

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image: Enzyme Design

Enzyme Design

By | December 3, 2014

Researchers create synthetic enzymes in the lab, encoded by artificial genetic material.

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image: A Cellar’s Cellular Treasure, 1992

A Cellar’s Cellular Treasure, 1992

By | December 1, 2014

A spring cleaning led to the rediscovery of Theodor Boveri’s microscope slides, presumed lost during World War II.

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image: Bespoke Cell Jackets

Bespoke Cell Jackets

By | December 1, 2014

Scientists make hydrogel coats for individual cells that can be tailored to specific research questions.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | December 1, 2014

December 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: New Piece of a Mysterious Channel

New Piece of a Mysterious Channel

By | November 25, 2014

Researchers have nailed down yet another component of the mechanotransduction complex responsible for relaying signals from hair cells in the ear.

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