The Scientist

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image: How Many Mammalian Viruses?

How Many Mammalian Viruses?

By | September 3, 2013

A project that identified almost every virus in the Indian flying fox heralds a new age of viral discovery.

5 Comments

image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

Bacteriophages shuttle genes between diverse ecosystems.

1 Comment

image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

From therapeutics to gene transfer, bacteriophages offer a sustainable and powerful method of controlling microbes.

6 Comments

image: Week in Review: August 26–30

Week in Review: August 26–30

By | August 30, 2013

New model for neurodevelopment; more biotechs going public; how a virus jumped from mammals to birds; statin side effect linked to genetic variant

0 Comments

image: Unexpected Origin of an Avian Virus

Unexpected Origin of an Avian Virus

By | August 27, 2013

The transmission of reticuloendotheliosis viruses from mammals to birds was most likely an unexpected consequence of medical research.

0 Comments

image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

0 Comments

image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

17 Comments

image: Bird Flu Experiments Proposed

Bird Flu Experiments Proposed

By | August 7, 2013

In a bid to avoid the controversy that dogged H5N1 research last year, flu researchers have published a letter proposing how to approach potentially dangerous research on H7N9.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews: Summer Fiction

Capsule Reviews: Summer Fiction

By | August 1, 2013

Crescent, An Empty Land of Plenty, Prophet of Bones, and Equilateral

1 Comment

image: Dolphins by Name

Dolphins by Name

By | July 23, 2013

Bottlenose dolphins can recognize and respond to their own “signature whistles,” strengthening the evidence that these whistles function like names.

2 Comments

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