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image: A Chill Issue

A Chill Issue

By | February 1, 2013

The very cold, the merely chilled, and the colorful

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

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image: Koala Time Machine

Koala Time Machine

By | January 1, 2013

Old koala pelts from museum collections are helping researchers to learn more about the retroviral invasion that may be endangering the Australian marsupial.

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image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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image: Special Review for H5N1 Grants?

Special Review for H5N1 Grants?

By | December 4, 2012

The National Institutes of Health reveals a controversial plan to regulate the funding of H5N1 research.

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image: Deleted Forever

Deleted Forever

By | December 1, 2012

By tapping local knowledge among African pastoralists and veterinarians, researchers successfully eradicated a deadly livestock virus—and are looking to replicate their success to halt other epidemics.

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image: The Plastic Genome

The Plastic Genome

By | December 1, 2012

The poxvirus stockpiles genes when it needs to adapt.

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image: Virus Monopolizes Host’s Repairmen

Virus Monopolizes Host’s Repairmen

By | November 29, 2012

Human cytomegalovirus fixes its broken DNA by exclusively co-opting its host’s repair proteins.

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