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image: Tracing Ebola’s Evolution

Tracing Ebola’s Evolution

By | June 18, 2015

Two independent teams examine the migration and evolution of the virus throughout the ongoing outbreak in West Africa.

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image: Eminent Virologist Dies

Eminent Virologist Dies

By | June 18, 2015

Emerging-disease researcher Richard Elliott has passed away at age 61.

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image: Sperm From Ovaries

Sperm From Ovaries

By | June 11, 2015

With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 

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image: A Plague on Pachyderms

A Plague on Pachyderms

By | June 1, 2015

At least seven species of herpesvirus commonly infect elephants. At zoos, keepers scramble to save calves, who are particularly vulnerable to the viruses.

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image: TS Live: Elephant Herpes

TS Live: Elephant Herpes

By | June 1, 2015

Researchers at the Smithsonian National Zoological Park in Washington, D.C., are studying a viral infection that can be lethal to elephant calves.

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image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

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image: Hiding in the Haystack

Hiding in the Haystack

By | May 1, 2015

Encouraging developments in HIV research

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image: Putting It Together

Putting It Together

By | May 1, 2015

Exploring viral replication pathways has led Carol Carter from the study of measles and reoviruses to the assembly and budding of newly minted HIV.

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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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