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image: New Giant Viruses Break Records

New Giant Viruses Break Records

By | July 22, 2013

Two newly discovered giant viruses are bigger than many bacteria and carry massive and largely unique genomes that hint at new branches of life.

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image: Beach Reading

Beach Reading

By | July 1, 2013

A vacation from your lab doesn’t have to mean a break from fascinating developments on the life science front.

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Contributors

By | July 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the July 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Sea Bugs

Sea Bugs

By | July 1, 2013

Ocean viruses can impact marine ecosystems in several ways.

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image: An Ocean of Viruses

An Ocean of Viruses

By | July 1, 2013

Viruses abound in the world’s oceans, yet researchers are only beginning to understand how they affect life and chemistry from the water’s surface to the sea floor.

3 Comments

image: Week in Review, June 17–21

Week in Review, June 17–21

By | June 21, 2013

On the gene patent decision; a high-res human brain model; bats’ influence on moths mating calls; toxicants threaten brain health; platelet-driven immunity

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image: Nailing Regeneration

Nailing Regeneration

By | June 12, 2013

Researchers identify the signaling program that enables finger and toenail stem cells to direct digit regeneration after amputation.

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Why Many Birds Don’t Have Penises

By | June 7, 2013

In avian species, a gene induces programmed cell death during development in the area where a phallus would otherwise grow.

1 Comment

image: Bird Flu Mutation Risk

Bird Flu Mutation Risk

By | June 6, 2013

Some H5N1 and H7N9 bird flu viruses could be one mutation away from spreading efficiently between humans.

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image: Loss of Potential

Loss of Potential

By | June 1, 2013

In the fruit fly, the ability of neural stem cells to make the full repertoire of neurons is regulated by the movement of key genes to the nuclear periphery.

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