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image: Week in Review: May 27–30

Week in Review: May 27–30

By | May 31, 2013

The mosquito’s role in malaria virulence; the value of grant review; Europe must embrace GM crops; why roaches avoid sugary bait

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Malaria parasites transmitted via mosquitoes elicit a more effective immune response and cause less severe infection than those directly injected into red blood cells.

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image: Drug Resistant Avian Flu

Drug Resistant Avian Flu

By | May 29, 2013

Three patients infected with the new H7N9 bird flu have developed resistance to antiviral drug treatment, causing great concern among doctors.

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image: BPA Dangers in Pregnancy?

BPA Dangers in Pregnancy?

By | May 28, 2013

Pregnant mice exposed to the chemical used in many plastics have offspring with behavioral abnormalities.

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image: Inhibit Mitochondria to Live Longer?

Inhibit Mitochondria to Live Longer?

By | May 22, 2013

Researchers find that reducing mitochondrial protein production in some animals can increase lifespan by activating a protective stress response.

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image: Macrophages Drive Regeneration

Macrophages Drive Regeneration

By | May 22, 2013

The activity of one type of immune cell helps regrow the limbs of amputated salamanders.

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image: Viruses Prefer the Cold

Viruses Prefer the Cold

By | May 20, 2013

Chilly weather could impede the immune reactions that most effectively contain viruses like the common cold.  

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image: Protective Phages

Protective Phages

By | May 20, 2013

Viruses that attack bacteria may be an important component of our gut microbiota.

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image: New Guardians Against Diabetes?

New Guardians Against Diabetes?

By | May 20, 2013

A new class of immune cell could protect against type 1 diabetes by suppressing other immune cells.

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image: Clock Genes Linked to Depression

Clock Genes Linked to Depression

By | May 15, 2013

Patients with major depressive disorder appear to have malfunctioning circadian rhythms, which could lead researchers to new avenues for treatment.

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