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image: Week in Review, June 17–21

Week in Review, June 17–21

By | June 21, 2013

On the gene patent decision; a high-res human brain model; bats’ influence on moths mating calls; toxicants threaten brain health; platelet-driven immunity

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image: Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

By | June 16, 2013

The cell fragments play a role in the body’s first line of defense against bacterial infection, helping white blood cells grab blood-borne bacteria in the liver.

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image: Bird Flu Mutation Risk

Bird Flu Mutation Risk

By | June 6, 2013

Some H5N1 and H7N9 bird flu viruses could be one mutation away from spreading efficiently between humans.

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image: Bird Bullies

Bird Bullies

By | June 1, 2013

Regular supplies of food for scavenger birds in Spain may not be the most effective conservation strategy, as smaller birds are bullied away.

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image: Mary O’Connor: Warming Up

Mary O’Connor: Warming Up

By | June 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia. Age: 34

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image: Salamander Evolution

Salamander Evolution

By | June 1, 2013

Yale University evolutionary biologist Steven Brady studies the evolutionary impacts of roads on the amphibians.

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image: Factoring in Face Time

Factoring in Face Time

By | June 1, 2013

How the study of human social interactions is helping researchers understand the spread of diseases like influenza and HIV

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Malaria parasites transmitted via mosquitoes elicit a more effective immune response and cause less severe infection than those directly injected into red blood cells.

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image: Drug Resistant Avian Flu

Drug Resistant Avian Flu

By | May 29, 2013

Three patients infected with the new H7N9 bird flu have developed resistance to antiviral drug treatment, causing great concern among doctors.

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image: Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

By | May 23, 2013

Researchers discover a microbe living at -15°C, the coldest temperature ever reported for bacterial growth, giving hope to the search for life elsewhere in the cosmos.

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