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image: Moratorium on Gain-of-Function Research

Moratorium on Gain-of-Function Research

By | October 21, 2014

In the wake of a handful of biosafety lapses at federal research facilities, the US government is temporarily halting funding for new studies aiming to give novel functions to influenza, SARS, and MERS viruses.

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image: Virus Decimating Spanish Amphibians

Virus Decimating Spanish Amphibians

By | October 20, 2014

Several toad, newt, and salamander populations are being hit hard by an emerging pathogen in a pristine national park in Spain.

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image: Urban Hub Aided Early HIV Spread

Urban Hub Aided Early HIV Spread

By | October 6, 2014

The AIDS pandemic probably began in the central African city of Kinshasa in the 1920s, a study shows.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Anatomy of a Virus

Anatomy of a Virus

By | September 16, 2014

A mass spectrometry-based analysis of influenza virions provides a detailed view of their composition.

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image: Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

By | September 11, 2014

Farms support less phylogenetically diverse bird populations than forests, but some farms are better than others.

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image: Viral Trek to the Brain

Viral Trek to the Brain

By | September 3, 2014

Rabies hitches a ride with a receptor for nerve growth factor.

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image: Six-Legged Syringes

Six-Legged Syringes

By | September 1, 2014

Researchers whose work requires that they draw blood from wild animals are finding unlikely collaborators in biting insects.

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image: The Iceman Cometh

The Iceman Cometh

By | September 1, 2014

Meet Ötzi, the Copper Age ice man who is helping scientists reconstruct changes in the population genetics of the red deer he hunted.

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image: This Bug Sucks

This Bug Sucks

By | September 1, 2014

An assassin bug, which some researchers are using as living syringes to sample blood from birds and mammals, feeds on a bat.

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