The Scientist

» virology, evolution and developmental biology

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image: Four-legged Snake Fossil Found

Four-legged Snake Fossil Found

By | July 27, 2015

Researchers discover an unprecedented paleontological relic that may just rewrite the book on snake evolution.

3 Comments

image: Warming Climate Hurt Megafauna?

Warming Climate Hurt Megafauna?

By | July 27, 2015

The massive mammals that roamed Earth some 30,000 years ago may have gone extinct as a result of global warming, according to an ancient-DNA study.

1 Comment

image: “Feathered Poodle From Hell” Dino Found

“Feathered Poodle From Hell” Dino Found

By | July 20, 2015

A newly discovered relative of Velociraptor had abundant plumage and birdlike wings.  

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image: Novel Hantavirus Infection Method

Novel Hantavirus Infection Method

By | July 3, 2015

Researchers find that the potentially deadly virus uses cholesterol to gain access to cells.

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image: Cuba Ends Mother-To-Child HIV

Cuba Ends Mother-To-Child HIV

By | July 2, 2015

The Caribbean nation is the first to effectively eliminate the prenatal transmission of syphilis and the virus that causes AIDS, according to the World Health Organization.

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image: High-Flying Ducks

High-Flying Ducks

By | July 1, 2015

Five species of waterfowl have evolved a variety of adaptations to adjust to the high altitude of South America’s Lake Titicaca.

1 Comment

image: How to Make a New Species

How to Make a New Species

By | July 1, 2015

Scientists mutate a mating pheromone and its corresponding receptor in yeast to promote speciation.

3 Comments

image: Monkey Business

Monkey Business

By | July 1, 2015

Travel to Bangladesh to meet the Bedey, a band of river nomads, and their trained macaques, which perform shows and seldom transmit a monkey virus to their handlers.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | July 1, 2015

July 2015's selection of notable quotes

5 Comments

image: The Lies That Scars Tell

The Lies That Scars Tell

By | July 1, 2015

Macaque trainers in Bangladesh are often bitten by their monkeys, but rarely infected by a particular simian retrovirus.

1 Comment

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