The Scientist

» virology, evolution and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Prehistoric Critters Change View of Mammal Evolution

Prehistoric Critters Change View of Mammal Evolution

By | September 12, 2014

Three extinct squirrel-like species were identified from Jurassic-era fossils in China.

1 Comment

image: Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

By | September 11, 2014

Farms support less phylogenetically diverse bird populations than forests, but some farms are better than others.

0 Comments

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | September 10, 2014

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

0 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | September 5, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

0 Comments

image: Humongous Herbivorous Dinosaur

Humongous Herbivorous Dinosaur

By | September 4, 2014

A near-complete titanosaur fossil provides new details of the dinosaurs’ lives. 

1 Comment

image: Losing Languages

Losing Languages

By | September 4, 2014

Biological criteria and evolutionary models help predict threats to spoken language, according to two studies.

0 Comments

image: Viral Trek to the Brain

Viral Trek to the Brain

By | September 3, 2014

Rabies hitches a ride with a receptor for nerve growth factor.

0 Comments

image: A Long Line of LINEs

A Long Line of LINEs

By | September 1, 2014

Different mechanisms repress mobile DNA elements in human embryonic stem cells depending on the elements’ evolutionary ages.

0 Comments

image: Head Scratchers

Head Scratchers

By | September 1, 2014

Many natural phenomena elude our understanding.

5 Comments

image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

3 Comments

Popular Now

  1. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  2. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  3. Sequencing Reveals Genomic Diversity of the Human Brain
  4. Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts
    The Nutshell Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts

    An open-access journal is trialing a peer-review process in which reviewers do not have access to the results or discussion sections of submitted papers.

RayBiotech