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image: Another Ancient Giant Virus Discovered

Another Ancient Giant Virus Discovered

By | September 14, 2015

From the same Siberian permafrost where three others were previously discovered, scientists find a fourth type of giant virus.

2 Comments

image: New <em>Homo</em> Species Found

New Homo Species Found

By | September 10, 2015

Researchers describe H. naledi, an ancient human ancestor of unknown age that may have buried its dead.

8 Comments

image: Compatible Company

Compatible Company

By | September 1, 2015

A guide to culturing cells with viruses in mind

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | September 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the September 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Do Mine Ears Deceive Me?

Do Mine Ears Deceive Me?

By | September 1, 2015

A new approach shows how both honesty and deception are stable features of noisy communication.

1 Comment

image: Hear and Now

Hear and Now

By | September 1, 2015

Auditory research advances worth shouting about

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image: Aural History

Aural History

By | September 1, 2015

The form and function of the ears of modern land vertebrates cannot be understood without knowing how they evolved.

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image: Vaccine Virus Sticks Around

Vaccine Virus Sticks Around

By | August 28, 2015

One man shed poliovirus for 28 years after he was vaccinated, researchers report.

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image: Synthetic DNA–based MERS Vaccine Shows Promise

Synthetic DNA–based MERS Vaccine Shows Promise

By | August 19, 2015

The experimental vaccine protects monkeys against the coronavirus that causes Middle East respiratory syndrome and elicits an immune response in camels.

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image: Yeast Genome Doubling

Yeast Genome Doubling

By | August 10, 2015

The results of a computational genetic analysis suggest Saccharomyces cerevisiae doubled its genome through species hybridization.

0 Comments

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