The Scientist

» virology and evolution

Most Recent

image: Performance Art

Performance Art

By | January 1, 2015

Regulation of genome expression orchestrates the behavior of insect castes and the human response to social stress.

0 Comments

image: Why, Oh Y?

Why, Oh Y?

By | January 1, 2015

A toothpick and a bit of chance shaped David Page’s career, which he has dedicated to understanding the mammalian Y chromosome and fetal germ cell development.

0 Comments

image: The Genetics of Society

The Genetics of Society

By | January 1, 2015

Researchers aim to unravel the molecular mechanisms by which a single genotype gives rise to diverse castes in eusocial organisms.

8 Comments

image: Unraveling H7N9’s History

Unraveling H7N9’s History

By | December 30, 2014

An analysis of stored samples shows that H7N9 precursor H9N2, a virus widespread in chickens, has shown increased fitness in recent years.

0 Comments

image: Bats the Source of Ebola?

Bats the Source of Ebola?

By | December 30, 2014

The epidemic in West Africa may have been sparked by bats in Guinea, researchers propose, but concrete evidence of the route of zoonotic infection is lacking.

2 Comments

image: 2014’s Best in Multimedia

2014’s Best in Multimedia

By | December 28, 2014

The Scientist’s standout videos and slideshows of the year

0 Comments

image: Repurposed Retroviruses

Repurposed Retroviruses

By | December 18, 2014

B cells have commandeered ancient viral sequences in the genome to transmit antigen signals.

0 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | December 18, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

0 Comments

image: Mining Existing Drugs for Ebola Treatments

Mining Existing Drugs for Ebola Treatments

By | December 17, 2014

Researchers hope to repurpose already-approved drugs into potential anti-Ebola therapies.

0 Comments

image: Iron-Ferrying Protein Impedes Pathogens

Iron-Ferrying Protein Impedes Pathogens

By | December 15, 2014

Meningitis-causing bacteria exerted strong evolutionary pressure on an iron-binding protein in primates, a study shows.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Broad Wins CRISPR Patent Interference Case
    Daily News Broad Wins CRISPR Patent Interference Case

    The USPTO’s Patent Trial and Appeal Board has ruled in favor of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard retaining intellectual property rights covered by its patents for CRISPR gene-editing technology.

  2. Henrietta Lacks’s Family Seeks Compensation
  3. Can Plants Learn to Associate Stimuli with Reward?
  4. Humans Never Stopped Evolving
    Features Humans Never Stopped Evolving

    The emergence of blood abnormalities, an adult ability to digest milk, and changes in our physical appearance point to the continued evolution of the human race.

Business Birmingham