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image: Genome Nation

Genome Nation

By | March 27, 2015

Researchers perform whole-genome sequencing on roughly 1 percent of the Icelandic population.


image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.


image: “Yeti” Just a Himalayan Bear?

“Yeti” Just a Himalayan Bear?

By | March 17, 2015

Latest analysis suggests the yeti is a known bear species, not the new, hybrid species suggested by a previous study.


image: Virus Denier Ordered to Pay Up

Virus Denier Ordered to Pay Up

By | March 16, 2015

A biologist who offered €100,000 to anyone who could prove that measles is a virus must pony up, a German court says.

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image: 23andMe Enters Drug Development

23andMe Enters Drug Development

By | March 12, 2015

The personal genomics firm announces plans to make medicines.


image: Horizontal Gene Transfer a Hallmark of Animal Genomes?

Horizontal Gene Transfer a Hallmark of Animal Genomes?

By | March 12, 2015

Foreign genes in animal genomes may be of bacterial or fungal origin, according to a new analysis.


image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | March 4, 2015

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes


image: Reading Between the Pages

Reading Between the Pages

By | March 1, 2015

Researchers at Trinity College Dublin and the University of York excavate the genetic secrets contained in the DNA of old parchments.

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image: Rethinking Telomeres

Rethinking Telomeres

By | March 1, 2015

Not only do telomeres protect the ends of chromosomes, they also modulate gene expression over cells’ lifetimes.


image: Slip Me Some Skin

Slip Me Some Skin

By | March 1, 2015

Scientists tracing the history of livestock breeding probe parchment documents for genetic information.


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