The Scientist

» virology

Most Recent

image: Cuba Ends Mother-To-Child HIV

Cuba Ends Mother-To-Child HIV

By | July 2, 2015

The Caribbean nation is the first to effectively eliminate the prenatal transmission of syphilis and the virus that causes AIDS, according to the World Health Organization.

0 Comments

image: Monkey Business

Monkey Business

By | July 1, 2015

Travel to Bangladesh to meet the Bedey, a band of river nomads, and their trained macaques, which perform shows and seldom transmit a monkey virus to their handlers.

0 Comments

image: The Lies That Scars Tell

The Lies That Scars Tell

By | July 1, 2015

Macaque trainers in Bangladesh are often bitten by their monkeys, but rarely infected by a particular simian retrovirus.

1 Comment

image: Neutralizing HIV

Neutralizing HIV

By | June 18, 2015

Engineered immunogens based on conserved patches of the virus’s envelope protein point to new strategies for vaccine design.

0 Comments

image: Tracing Ebola’s Evolution

Tracing Ebola’s Evolution

By | June 18, 2015

Two independent teams examine the migration and evolution of the virus throughout the ongoing outbreak in West Africa.

0 Comments

image: Eminent Virologist Dies

Eminent Virologist Dies

By | June 18, 2015

Emerging-disease researcher Richard Elliott has passed away at age 61.

0 Comments

image: A Plague on Pachyderms

A Plague on Pachyderms

By | June 1, 2015

At least seven species of herpesvirus commonly infect elephants. At zoos, keepers scramble to save calves, who are particularly vulnerable to the viruses.

5 Comments

image: TS Live: Elephant Herpes

TS Live: Elephant Herpes

By | June 1, 2015

Researchers at the Smithsonian National Zoological Park in Washington, D.C., are studying a viral infection that can be lethal to elephant calves.

0 Comments

image: Hiding in the Haystack

Hiding in the Haystack

By | May 1, 2015

Encouraging developments in HIV research

0 Comments

image: Putting It Together

Putting It Together

By | May 1, 2015

Exploring viral replication pathways has led Carol Carter from the study of measles and reoviruses to the assembly and budding of newly minted HIV.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. GM Mosquitoes Closer to Release in U.S.
  2. German Scientists Resign from Elsevier Journals’ Editorial Boards
  3. Symmetrical Eyes Indicate Dyslexia
  4. Judge Recommends Ruling to Block Internet Access to Sci-Hub
RayBiotech