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image: Virologist Dies

Virologist Dies

By | February 8, 2013

The editor-in-chief of the open access journal Retrovirology has passed away unexpectedly.


image: A Chill Issue

A Chill Issue

By | February 1, 2013

The very cold, the merely chilled, and the colorful


image: Contributors


By | February 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2013 issue of The Scientist.


image: Koala Time Machine

Koala Time Machine

By | January 1, 2013

Old koala pelts from museum collections are helping researchers to learn more about the retroviral invasion that may be endangering the Australian marsupial.


image: Special Review for H5N1 Grants?

Special Review for H5N1 Grants?

By | December 4, 2012

The National Institutes of Health reveals a controversial plan to regulate the funding of H5N1 research.


image: Deleted Forever

Deleted Forever

By | December 1, 2012

By tapping local knowledge among African pastoralists and veterinarians, researchers successfully eradicated a deadly livestock virus—and are looking to replicate their success to halt other epidemics.

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image: The Plastic Genome

The Plastic Genome

By | December 1, 2012

The poxvirus stockpiles genes when it needs to adapt.

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image: Virus Monopolizes Host’s Repairmen

Virus Monopolizes Host’s Repairmen

By | November 29, 2012

Human cytomegalovirus fixes its broken DNA by exclusively co-opting its host’s repair proteins.


image: Ebola from Pigs to Monkeys

Ebola from Pigs to Monkeys

By | November 15, 2012

A deadly Ebola virus can spread from pigs to monkeys without direct contact, pointing to pig farms as a possible contributor to outbreaks.


image: Viral Skeleton

Viral Skeleton

By | November 1, 2012

A newly discovered family of tubulins—members of the cytoskeleton—encoded by bacteriophages plays a role in arranging the location of DNA within virus’s bacterial host.


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