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image: Smurf-y Old Age

Smurf-y Old Age

By | April 1, 2013

Flies turning blue help researchers link the deterioration of the intestinal barrier to age-related death.

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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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image: Next Generation: Dynamic, Nanoscale GFP

Next Generation: Dynamic, Nanoscale GFP

By | February 12, 2013

A new faster-switching, longer-lasting GFP allows gentler and faster high resolution microscopy on living cells.

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image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

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image: Next Generation: Nano-Imaging

Next Generation: Nano-Imaging

By | January 31, 2013

Researchers take advantage of a diamond’s atomic flaw to devise a sensor that may one day snap images of individual molecules.

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image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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image: Next Generation: Robotic Inchworm

Next Generation: Robotic Inchworm

By | November 20, 2012

Researchers use 3D printing to create miniature robots powered by rat cardiac cells that move like caterpillars.

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