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image: Next Generation: Separation Two Ways

Next Generation: Separation Two Ways

By | June 26, 2012

Researchers designed a microfluidics chip to separate cells using gravity and a force field.

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image: Next Generation: The Heart Camera

Next Generation: The Heart Camera

By | June 19, 2012

A new camera system allows researchers to measure multiple cardiac signals at once to understand how they interact to control heart function.

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image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

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image: Growing Human Eggs

Growing Human Eggs

By | June 1, 2012

Germline stem cells discovered in human ovaries can be cultured into fresh eggs.

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image: Next Generation: The Brain Bot

Next Generation: The Brain Bot

By | May 29, 2012

A 30-year-old technique to record the electrical activity of neurons gets a robotic makeover.

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image: Next Generation: Good Vibrations

Next Generation: Good Vibrations

By | May 23, 2012

Adding texture to a lotus-leaf-like surface lets researchers control the movement of liquid droplets, and provides a cheap alternative for microfluidic applications.

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image: Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

By | May 7, 2012

Human-specific duplications of a gene involved in brain development may have contributed to our species’ unique intelligence.

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image: Stem Cell Suicide Switch

Stem Cell Suicide Switch

By | May 3, 2012

Human embryonic stem cells swiftly kill themselves in response to DNA damage.

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image: The Sugar Lnc

The Sugar Lnc

By | May 1, 2012

Genes that react to cellular sugar content are regulated by a long non-coding RNA via an unexpected mechanism

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image: Boyle’s Monsters, 1665

Boyle’s Monsters, 1665

By | May 1, 2012

From accounts of deformed animals to scratch-and-sniff technology, Robert Boyle's early contributions to the Royal Society of London were prolific and wide ranging.

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