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image: Next Generation: Regulated Wrinkles

Next Generation: Regulated Wrinkles

By | August 9, 2012

Researchers devise a way to create predictably patterned microwrinkles.

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image: Space-bound Fish

Space-bound Fish

By | July 31, 2012

Japanese astronauts deliver an aquarium to the International Space Station to study the effects of microgravity on marine life.

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image: Next Generation: Ciliated Sensor

Next Generation: Ciliated Sensor

By | July 30, 2012

Researchers create a sensitive, flexible mechanosensor with possible applications in biomedical sensing and artificial skin technology.

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image: Next Generation: Robotic Eye

Next Generation: Robotic Eye

By | July 13, 2012

Researchers create a robotic eye that mimics real muscle movement.

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image: Next Generation: Separation Two Ways

Next Generation: Separation Two Ways

By | June 26, 2012

Researchers designed a microfluidics chip to separate cells using gravity and a force field.

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image: Next Generation: The Heart Camera

Next Generation: The Heart Camera

By | June 19, 2012

A new camera system allows researchers to measure multiple cardiac signals at once to understand how they interact to control heart function.

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image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

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image: Growing Human Eggs

Growing Human Eggs

By | June 1, 2012

Germline stem cells discovered in human ovaries can be cultured into fresh eggs.

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image: Next Generation: The Brain Bot

Next Generation: The Brain Bot

By | May 29, 2012

A 30-year-old technique to record the electrical activity of neurons gets a robotic makeover.

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image: Next Generation: Good Vibrations

Next Generation: Good Vibrations

By | May 23, 2012

Adding texture to a lotus-leaf-like surface lets researchers control the movement of liquid droplets, and provides a cheap alternative for microfluidic applications.

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