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Speciation and development of new traits may not always go hand-in-hand.

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image: Science Teaching Standards up for Revision in Texas

Science Teaching Standards up for Revision in Texas

By | February 9, 2017

Despite a committee of educators recommending the removal of language challenging evolution in science curricula, state education board members vote to reintroduce controversial concepts. 

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An ingestible, electronic capsule can harvest energy from stomach acid for up to a week in a pig model system.

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image: How Plants Evolved to Eat Meat

How Plants Evolved to Eat Meat

By | February 7, 2017

Pitcher plants across different continents acquired their tastes for meat in similar ways.

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image: Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

By | January 31, 2017

These millimeter-size sea creatures lived 540 million years ago.

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Using simulations, scientists report that a mixture of termites and plant competition may be responsible for the strange patterns of earth surrounded by plants in the Namib desert. 

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A cell phone–based microscope can identify mutations in tumor tissue and image products of DNA sequencing reactions.

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image: Baboons Can Make Sounds Found in Human Speech

Baboons Can Make Sounds Found in Human Speech

By | January 13, 2017

The findings suggest language may have started to evolve millions of years earlier than once thought.  

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image: Next Generation: Biocompatible Microdevices

Next Generation: Biocompatible Microdevices

By | January 6, 2017

A new fabrication strategy enables scientists to manufacture fully biocompatible, implantable medical devices. 

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image: Adaptation, Island Style

Adaptation, Island Style

By | January 3, 2017

Anole lizards inhabiting the Caribbean islands display some of the key principles of evolution.

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